WARRIOR QUEEN STORY 2 – BOUDICCA QUEEN OF THE ICENI

Posted by deborahleey on 2nd December 2012 in Music Notes

For the Celts, rape doesn’t seem to have been so much shameful as demanding dial–revenge. Boudicca, one of history’s most powerful women, suffered rape only vicariously — as a mother
, but her revenge detroyed thousands. Prasutagus, king of the Iceni, made an alliance with Rome so that he would be allowed to rule his territory (as a client-king). He died in 60 A.D.

Ignoring the rights of Prasutagus, Senator Tacitus of the Roman empire made the emperor and his own two daughters heirs, hoping, thereby, to placate Rome. Such a will was not in accordance with Celtic law; nor did it satisfy the new emperor, for centurions plundered Prasutagus’ house, whipped his widow, Boudicca, and raped their daughters.

It was time for revenge (“dial”). Boudicca, as ruler and war leader of the Iceni, led a retaliatory revolt against the Romans. Enlisting the support of the neighboring tribe of Trinovantes and possibly some others, she headed towards the town the Romans called Camulodunum, the new administrative capital of the Roman imperial province. After Boudicca’s forces resoundingly defeated the Roman troops at Camulodonum and virtually annihilated the IX Hispania, they headed towards London. The Roman commander chose to sacrifice London, so when Boudicca’s troops arrived, they slaughtered all Romans and razed the town.

Then the tide turned. Not to dwell on the sad details — eventually Boudicca was defeated, but not captured. She and her daughters are thought to have taken poison to avoid capture and ritual execution at Rome.

Song: Iceni Queen

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